Blind Tom Obstacle Race

From: mott@oodis01.hill.af.mil (Dan Mott)

• Many Obstacles

• 6 Blindfolds

Select four to six scouts, who are lined up at one end of the room. Place obstacles on the Floor: a pile of books, an overturned chair, bottles, a lamp etc. Instruct the players to memorize the position of each object. The scouts who are the players then face the wall and are blindfolded. While this being done, the obstacles are quietly being removed. The players are then turned around and told to walk to the opposite wall without colliding with any obstacles. Clever suggestions can be offered by the scout leader to make it more interesting. Have one of the waiters try the course; only leave some obstacles.

Human Obstacle Course

From: mott@oodis01.hill.af.mil (Dan Mott)

Team members line up before the starting line. Ten additional members are used as an obstacle course: a standing pole to go around, a leg tunnel to go under, kneels on all fours to leap over, sitters with legs outstretched to step in and among, another standing pole to circle around and return to the starting line. Runner must repeat if missed or improperly executed.

Obstacle Course In The Dark

• Various items that will fall over easily such as skittles

• Plastic bottles and short lengths of wood or plastic tube

Give each team the same type and number of objects. Allocate each team a lane down the length of the hall across which they must lay out the obstacles. You could mark these lanes with chairs if you wished. When the teams have completed their task, line them up at one end of the hall and then get them to swap lanes with one of the other teams. This way if they have made the obstacle too easy then they will give this advantage away to another team. After allowing them a minute or two to look at the lane they are in, turn out the light and get them to walk down the lane to the other end. The patrol leader or sixer should be the leader for his team. At the finish end of the hall, one of the leaders could flash a torch on and off at random to give them a bearing. Points are deducted from each team for the number of obstacles they have knocked over.

The Other Guy’s Obstacle Course

>From: rickcl@pogo.wv.tek.com (Rick Clements)

Standard set-up, but small: tire to go through, chest-high rope to go over, ‚creek‘ to cross, bell suspended out-of-reach to ring. Trick is, you may not do anything to maneuver yourself thru any obstacle – the other people in the Patrol have to push/pull/carry/ lift/etc. you thru! First Scout lies down, and is stuffed thru the tire, whereupon he may help pull subsequent Scouts thru. At the over-the-rope obstacle, each Scout must be lifted over by the others & deposited on the other side (getting the last one over can take ingenuity!). To go over the ‚creek‘, the Scout whose turn it is may not ‚get wet‘, but everyone else may. The most amusing effective solution I’ve seen was a Patrol that had their strongest Scout carry the 3 smallest across at one time, then had the small guys go to hands-&-knees in the creek, pushed the big guy over across the kneeling Scouts‘ backs, & had him pull the others over. Build a human pyramid to reach the bell. Timed event, starts at ref’s ‚Go!‘, ends when bell rings. Lots of tumbling around.

Tilt

• A billy can half filled with water per team

• An aluminium foil cake container per team

• An Alka-Seltzer tablet per team

For each patrol, put an Alka-Seltzer tablets in each foil cake dish and then float one cake dish in each patrols billy can. The patrols must now transport the billycan through an obstacle course without the tablet getting wet or falling into the water. They are not allowed to touch the foil disk or the tablet. The patrols could either carry the billy cans by their handles, or if you are feeling very mean, you could get them to pick them up between two poles.


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